All posts filed under: GAFS

Presenting the New, Online Graduate Journal of Food Studies

I’m pleased, thrilled, delighted, [insert enthusiastic verb!] to present the new Graduate Association for Food Studies website, which I had the pleasure of building with support from my colleague and friend, Brad Jones. The new website features our now fully digital Graduate Journal of Food Studies. While the Journal has always been open access and available as a beautifully designed PDF, we are excited to move the journal into its next stage, where we endeavor to lead the way in online publishing with food studies scholarship that is peer-reviewed, rigorous, engaging, and decidedly interdisciplinary, as well as gorgeous, flexible, and sharable. With these goals in mind, we’re also launching a new section of the Journal called Food-Stuff, which invites a variety of food studies scholarship outside of the traditional academic article. Food-Stuff pieces may take the form of field notes, archival reports, commentaries, interviews, and photo essays. We also welcome proposals for additional creative formats. On the new website, you’ll also continue to find information about GAFS, our membership benefits, and how to join the premiere international graduate student …

Announcing the Graduate Journal of Food Studies 2.2 & the End of Food Puns

Look no further for groundbreaking scholarship, throught-provking book reviews, and stirring art from emerging scholars. The third issue of the Graduate Journal of Food Studies (volume 2, no. 2) is now live online. The issue starts with editor-in-chief Carla Cevasco’s insightful letter, “I hate food puns,” which urges us all to refrain from foodie figurative language in an effort to bolster the intellectual foundations and popular perceptions of our field. Gone be the “food fights,” “seats at the table,” and, sigh, “food for thought.” I especially love her assertion that these phrases make food studies appear “fun” and approachable, but in the end, “Food studies should not be easy.” Our topics may be quotidian. That’s what makes them powerful and meaningful. Our conferences and events may consider eating and drinking primary. That’s experiential learning and intellectual embodiment, purposeful commensality and mindful consumption. Our work speaks to students and the public. That’s how our field will continue to expand and survive. Food studies is not a passing fad nor a field of inquiry with soft edges. As Carla argues so well, its acuity …

Conference Save the Date: Graduate Association for Food Studies, October ’15

Mark those calendars people! The Future of Food Studies, the first conference of the Graduate Association for Food Studies, will be held 23-25 October 2015, at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The conference will include a keynote talk by Fabio Parasecoli, food studies scholar and coordinator of the Food Studies program at the New School, as well as graduate student panels that you won’t want to miss. The conference theme directly engages the complexity of food studies’ status as a “burgeoning” field, as so many characterize it. With roots in the late 1980s, food studies has consistently gathered steam—as well as a critical mass of articles, dedicated monographs, professional organizations, journals, and university programs—with more opportunities surfacing each year. The conference will engage these changes, actively pondering what the future of the discipline holds, conceptually, methodologically, and publicly. Graduate students are encouraged to submit paper and panel proposals by the CFP deadline of 31 May 2015. And I welcome everyone interested in the future of food studies to mark your calendars and plan to join us at Harvard in October. Please share widely—including this snazzy save …

Announcing the Graduate Journal of Food Studies 2.1

In case you haven’t heard, the second issue of the Graduate Journal of Food Studies came out last week online and will soon make its way to the mailboxes of subscribing members! I was thrilled to have my research on trophy kitchens included in the first issue and the second issue is just as thoughtful and beautifully designed, featuring four original research articles, multiple reviews on some of the most recent food studies publications, and stellar photography. So with this news, what should you do next? Read the Graduate Journal of Food Studies winter 2015 issue (2.1). Join the Graduate Association for Food Studies, an organization that connects graduate students with an interest in food studies, promotes their work, and provides myriad resources for publishing, networking, presenting at conferences, and more. It’ll be the best $20 you ever spend. Submit a proposal for the first edition of the biennial Graduate Food Studies Conference to be held in Boston, 23-25 October 2015. The submission deadline is 31 May 2015. Submit an article, book review, or photography/art for consideration for the Journal’s third edition. The …

Sink Your Teeth into the First Edition of the ‘Graduate Journal of Food Studies’

I could not be more thrilled to have my paper, “Not Just for Cooking Anymore: Exploring the Twenty-First-Century Trophy Kitchen” published in the first edition of the Graduate Journal of Food Studies, which came out today. In case you’re new to the journal, the Graduate Journal of Food Studies is “an international student-run and refereed journal dedicated to encouraging and promoting interdisciplinary food scholarship at the graduate level. Published bi-yearly in digital form, the journal is a space for promising scholars to showcase their exceptional academic research. The journal hopes to foster dialogue and engender debate among students across the academic community. It features food-focused articles from diverse disciplines including, but not limited to: anthropology, history, sociology, cultural studies, gender studies, economics, art, politics, pedagogy, nutrition, philosophy, and religion.” The Graduate Journal of Food Studies also includes a Book Reviews section. Graduate students interested in being part of the journal’s second edition may submit an original food-related essay by May 31, 2014. Now, get ready to sink your teeth into the fabulous first edition of the Graduate Journal of Food Studies!