All posts filed under: publications

Publication Update! Toned Tummies & Bloated Bellies: Activia Yogurt & Gendered Digestion

I’m thrilled to share that my article, “Toned Tummies and Bloated Bellies: Activia Yogurt and Gendered Digestion,” was recently published in CuiZine: The Journal of Canadian Food Cultures. I blogged about this project when I first completed it about a year ago and could not be more honored that it was selected as CuiZine‘s best graduate student paper in 2013 by a committee featuring the food writers, scholars, and researchers Maeve Haldane, Ian Mosby, and David Szanto. As I analzyed this probiotic yogurt that continues to populate the dairy case with its iconic green containers, I drew from print and online advertisements, product packaging, press coverage, and industry reports, as well as a variety of secondary sources that analyze digestion as a cultural act. When I first began this study, Jamie Lee Curtis served as a spokeswoman so enthusiastic that her commercials had become the stuff of Saturday Night Live parody. Most all Activia advertisements targeted women, many featuring feminine touches, from the product’s waist-like logo to commercials’ girly jingle—“Ac-tiv-i-aaaah!” Furthermore, whether a print ad or TV commercial, nearly every marketing effort …

Not Just for Cooking Anymore: Deconstructing the Twenty-First-Century Trophy Kitchen

This post contains an expanded abstract for “Not Just for Cooking Anymore: Deconstructing the Twenty-First-Century Trophy Kitchen,” which I presented in April 2012 at the Language of Food Conference at Cornell University, a thought-provoking event, directed by my now wonderful friend, Diana Garvin. This paper was then published in the Graduate Journal of Food Studies, Winter 2014. Download the PDF here.  More than ever before, the American kitchen is center stage. A variety of converging factors explain its ascent within the home and the American consciousness. With the inception of the Food Network (1993), Home and Garden Television (1994), shows such as MTV Cribs (2000), and a deluge of magazines and websites, images of the dream kitchens used by famous chefs, owned by celebrities, and purchased by aspiring homebuyers bombard American viewers. The near constant barrage of ideal kitchen images is one factor that has contributed to the redefinition of the American kitchen. Drawing from kitchen design history, popular culture, and current kitchen renewal trends, this paper shows that today’s ideal kitchen breaks the mold that defines the kitchen itself. …