9 Search Results for: teaching cookbooks

Teaching Food Studies, Cookbooks & Writing

How do cookbooks speak? What stories do they tell—and whose? What do cookbooks reveal about power and how it operates? How do cookbooks communicate and construct gender? These are some of the questions my students and I have pondered lately in our course “Food and Gender in U.S. Popular Culture” at Brown University. For our first assignment, students analyzed how cookbooks prescribe and transgress conventional gender roles. A uniquely interdisciplinary field, food studies scholarship often employs various methods, but the close reading of cookbooks is one method that approaches universality. Perhaps that’s part of why I’ve written on them so often (like here, here, and here). I’m working with a thoughtful and engaged group of 20 mostly first- and second-year students. While most had read and used cookbooks for cooking, few had previously considered them as elements of popular culture, as valuable historical evidence, as prescriptive literature that shape notions of gender, or as sources in which the so-often-silenced voices of women and people of color can be heard. In an effort to fully scaffold and support our work with cookbooks, we first did some reading. …

About

My research explores the connections between food, the body, health, and identities in the everyday American experience and popular culture. My book project, based on my dissertation, examines how media representations of food, cooking, and dieting construct and negotiate masculinities in our current historical moment. This fall I’ll join the faculty of the University of Tulsa as Assistant Professor of Media Studies. 

Presenting My Students’ Final Project in Food + Gender

I’m thrilled to share my students’ final project, an e-journal that culminates our course, “Food and Gender in U.S. Popular Culture,” at Brown University. In this seminar-style course, twenty students (mostly in their first and second years of study) completed four main writing assignments — a cookbook analysis (which I blogged about here), a mini media exhibit, an interview profile, and a restaurant review — all of which engaged the themes of food and gender. For the final project, students worked to revise one of these assignments for inclusion in the class e-journal. We invite you to start with the About page to learn more about the class and our writing. As you will read, these writing assignments expect (and deliver!) clear and sophisticated argument, as well as what we called “compulsively readable” prose. Course readings included not only academic food studies texts, but also a full serving of food writing, providing a taste of different styles and formats. Throughout the semester, we aimed to craft not only compelling thesis statements, but also at least one “aspirational sentence” …

CV

  Education  PhD, AMERICAN STUDIES, expected May 2018 Brown University  Doctoral Certificate: Gender and Sexuality Studies, expected May 2018 Dissertation: “The Dudification of Diet: Food Masculinities in Twenty-First-Century America” Dissertation Committee: Susan Smulyan (director), Professor of American Studies and Director, John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage; Richard Meckel (reader), Professor of American Studies; Deborah Weinstein (reader), Assistant Professor of American Studies Preliminary Exam Fields: Twentieth Century U.S. Cultural History: Consumption, Popular Culture, and Media Studies; Women and Gender Studies; Historical and Critical Studies of Food and Health MA, AMERICAN STUDIES, 2015 Brown University MLA, GASTRONOMY, 2013 Boston University Thesis: “Marketing Weight Loss Programs to Men in the Twenty-First Century” Advisor: Warren Belasco, Professor Emeritus of American Studies, University of Maryland; Second Reader: Carole Counihan, Professor Emerita of Anthropology, Millersville University MPH, PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION, 2009 University of California, Berkeley  Comprehensive Exam: “How Do We Increase Teacher Participation in a School District-Wide Worksite Wellness Program? A Focus Group Plan for Franklin McKinley School District in San Jose, California;” Advisors: Lia Fernald, Professor of Public Health Nutrition and Susan Kayman, …